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Domain Names Forum

    
Major Change in Domain Name system?
Allowing non-Roman characters in domain name.
outrun




msg:3865430
 12:26 am on Mar 8, 2009 (gmt 0)

[blogs.zdnet.com...]

CANN, the governing body for Internet addresses, today discussed global Internet address expansion at its 34th international public meeting in Mexico City, detailing “the possibility of one of the most dramatic expansions to the global Internet addressing system since it was created.”

This is “potentially the largest change to the domain name system…in history,” he said. The allowance of character sets apart from roman characters, “that’s a really big deal,” he said.

This will make phishing a lot of fun... e.g - ébay.com

 

mack




msg:3866868
 2:43 am on Mar 10, 2009 (gmt 0)

I hope this dosn't happen, purely from a security point of view. The ebay example you gave would reel a lot of people in. Simply checking the address bar will not be enough for a lot of users who will still see the correct address.

Mack.

kaled




msg:3867105
 12:32 pm on Mar 10, 2009 (gmt 0)

They really aren't very bright at ICANN...

All that is required is to devise a system whereby accented characters in domain names are mapped to their non-accented equivalents. Of course, this would not generate any money!

ICANN seem to be hell-bent on forcing website owners to register multiple domain names for each website merely to generate income for themselves. Considering that they claim to be a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation (their words) someone should put a stop to this.

Kaled.

webdoctor




msg:3867113
 1:02 pm on Mar 10, 2009 (gmt 0)

All that is required is to devise a system whereby accented characters in domain names are mapped to their non-accented equivalents.

No offence, but how much experience do you have in languages with accented characters? :-)

The Swedes appear to have accepted that A replaces Å if you can't find Å on your keyboard, but for German speakers using U instead of Ü is just wrong - you use UE instead.

Who gets to decide what is "equivalent" for each character in each language?

kaled




msg:3867223
 3:26 pm on Mar 10, 2009 (gmt 0)

No offence taken, however...

A single character set will be required for urls (presumably UTF-8, although ICANN don't seem to have thought that far ahead). So if any non-ascii character appears to be an accented version of an ascii character (in that character set) then the character should be remapped to an ascii character for the purpose of resolving the domain name.

The decision as to which characters need to be remapped would have to be made by humans and would be subject to argument, however, there would be fewer arguments doing this than opening up the can of worms that has been suggested.

In the example that you gave, I see no reason in principle why Ü should not map to UE since the whole domain would have to be parsed from one string into another (not necessarily the same length). In any case, it is unimportant, since the url that would be displayed in the address bar would use Ü not UE (if that was what the user typed or how the link was constructed) i.e. my suggestion would operate behind the scenes and be invisible to users.

Using my system
1) Similar domain names could not be registered.
2) All references to similar domain names would be remapped invisibly to a single domain name.

This is little more than an extension of case-insensitivity.

Kaled.

webdoctor




msg:3867328
 5:36 pm on Mar 10, 2009 (gmt 0)

Using my system
1) Similar domain names could not be registered.
2) All references to similar domain names would be remapped invisibly to a single domain name.

This is little more than an extension of case-insensitivity.

Case-insensitivity was in place from the beginning AFAIK.

What you're suggesting changes the rules of the game after the game has started. People with accented domains would lose them, in almost all cases the non-accented version is already registered, in many cases necessarily by the same owner. How would you propose compensating the people who will lose their domains?

Full disclosure: yes, I own a handful of .org domains with accented characters; no, they aren't high-value domains!

kaled




msg:3867395
 7:10 pm on Mar 10, 2009 (gmt 0)

What you're suggesting changes the rules of the game after the game has started.

It should be possible to maintain existing accented domain names (but makes the problem slightly more complex) but in many cases, it would simply save money because owners would not need to renew as many variations.

Companies often voluntarily rebrand themselves, change address, etc. However, from time time, such changes are forced upon them - that's life!

Kaled.

pageoneresults




msg:3867411
 7:24 pm on Mar 10, 2009 (gmt 0)

Homograph Spoofing Attack
[webmasterworld.com...]

^ I have a little bit of research tied into that. :)

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