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sTLD .post Evolution - No Comment!
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msg:3469984
 1:59 pm on Oct 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

There is a letter [pdf] from the Universal Postal Union (UPU) to ICANN concerning the use of their sTLD .post that may well have important implications for the future evolution of the domain name system.

The comment period closes in one day (6 October) and so far there have so far been no comments at all from the community.

sTLD .post Evolution - No Comment! [blog.icann.org]

Here's a link to the original message from ICANN

[icann.org...]

 

lexipixel




msg:3470065
 3:40 pm on Oct 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

I really don't get it --- why is this significant?

.post in French would be .poteau

.post in Italian would be .alberino

.post in Brazilian Portuguese would be .borne

amznVibe




msg:3470066
 3:41 pm on Oct 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

Maybe because it's such a terrible TLD? Seriously.

I am starting to believe most new TLD sponsorships are investment attempts
at gleaning fees from the Fortune 500 in defensive registrations on the new TLD.

[edited by: amznVibe at 3:44 pm (utc) on Oct. 5, 2007]

jtara




msg:3470115
 4:19 pm on Oct 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

And .com in various languages would be....

gibbergibber




msg:3470685
 2:37 pm on Oct 6, 2007 (gmt 0)

--Maybe because it's such a terrible TLD? Seriously.--

It is a terrible TLD, there can't be more than a few hundred postal organisations worldwide and (as someone said above) most of them don't even use the word "post" in their languages. What is the point of a TLD if hardly anyone wants to use it?

I just don't see the point of these ultra-specialist TLDs.

Even in English-speaking countries people don't remember them anywhere near as well as .com addresses, and as others have pointed out they frequently only work in english and are meaningless in other languages. They may not even be pronounceable in other languages.

The only reason we have website names instead of numbers is to make them easier to remember, and a .post address doesn't do that.

I'd say the same about .aero, .coop, .museum, .name, .travel, .jobs, .pro and .mobi as well, totally pointless, far too specific and they only work in english.

In fact I predict .mobi will become obsolete as more and more phones get PC-quality browsers (the most popular smartphone platform, Symbian S60, has had a PC-quality browser for a couple of years now, and the iPhone recently launched with one). This happened to WAP sites, lots of fanfare but hardly anyone used them, and they were soon rendered obsolete by the ubiquity of simple HTML browsers.

The domain name system in the UK has all kinds of silly second level domains including .me.uk (yes, me as in myself), .police.uk, .parliament.uk (why not just parliament.gov.uk?), .mod.uk (the ministry of defence, why not just mod.gov.uk?) etc etc. I really hope the TLD system doesn't go down this route.

--I am starting to believe most new TLD sponsorships are investment attempts at gleaning fees from the Fortune 500 in defensive registrations on the new TLD.--

I think you're absolutely right, the first thing the TLD controllers do is hype up how important it is to "get in there first", and people are panicked into buying additional domain names thinking they have to protect their identity.

-- And .com in various languages would be....--

.com is far, far better as an international domain. It's short, it's easy to remember, it's relatively easy to pronounce in many languages, it doesn't mean anything specific in any language, and many languages contain words related to COMmerce, COMpanies or COMputing which make it easy to remember.

[edited by: gibbergibber at 2:49 pm (utc) on Oct. 6, 2007]

vincevincevince




msg:3470691
 2:48 pm on Oct 6, 2007 (gmt 0)

Interestingly, this way of handing out domains is exactly how .com etc. should have been handled - trusted bodies handing them out without charge to other trusted bodies who deserve them.

g1smd




msg:3470766
 5:52 pm on Oct 6, 2007 (gmt 0)

Domain TLD assignments seem to have gone the way of the USENET fiasco. USENET had a limited number of top-level categories and then people added in their own "proprietory" Top Levels. Now there are hundreds, and the original naming scheme has been all but buried.

Rosalind




msg:3470804
 6:51 pm on Oct 6, 2007 (gmt 0)

Has anyone considered how all these extra names will break a lot of email and domain-checking regular expressions? Because whenever a new one comes out you either have to add another one to all your scripts, or go down the route of accepting almost any combination of letters after the dot as valid.

ddmedia




msg:3470938
 1:46 am on Oct 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

I only see one sector making money off new tlds...the registrars.

vincevincevince




msg:3470940
 1:52 am on Oct 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

Has anyone considered how all these extra names will break a lot of email and domain-checking regular expressions?

If your TLD is more than three characters in length I'll reject it and force you to enter another address. My little way of helping ensure that these new domain names stay backwaters and fighting .info spam!

swa66




msg:3471063
 11:47 am on Oct 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

.post in French would be .poteau

"poteau" in French is indeed a translation for the English "post" but only in the sense of post where it is used to indicate a "pole", not for the service that delivers letters. In French that'd be "la poste".

Aside of that -as usual- additional TLD are nonsense in themselves. The are country TLDs, I'm sure all of them can accommodate the few postal services in each of them. Perhaps it might yield better management of those ccTLDs a a side effect. Think of those ccTLDs that get (ab)used due to their interestign letters like ".tv", ".tm", ".nu", ".to", ... (yep, those all represent countries).

HuskyPup




msg:3471137
 2:13 pm on Oct 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

.post in Italian would be .alberino

Errr...try poste

In German try post

In Portuguese try post, Im pretty sure anyway!

In Spanish try poste

IMHO not many countries/people would not recognise post however whether it is a valid extension is another matter.

(the most popular smartphone platform, Symbian S60, has had a PC-quality browser for a couple of years now, and the iPhone recently launched with one).

Not everyone wants this type of phone therefore keeping to the .mobi standards would be essential for what could possibly be the majority of phone users.

Anyone have the actual figures of the types of phones produced by platform?

gibbergibber




msg:3471207
 4:32 pm on Oct 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

--Not everyone wants this type of phone therefore keeping to the .mobi standards would be essential for what could possibly be the majority of phone users.--

It won't be a question of people actively seeking PC-style browsers, they will simply come as standard even on the cheaper models. It will be very difficult NOT to buy a phone with a PC-style browser.

Ten years ago phones had no kind of browser. Five years ago most phone models might have had WAP browsers but no simple HTML browser. Now most models have simple HTML browsers. In another five or ten years, we will probably see most phone models incorporating PC-style browsers.

--Anyone have the actual figures of the types of phones produced by platform? --

Mobile phones in total sell 250 million a quarter, Symbian (the largest platform) sold 18.7 million last quarter and has 72% smartphone market share, so that makes about 26 million smartphones per quarter in total. That gives smartphones just over a 10% share of the global phone market.

However, that's distorted slightly by most phones being basic models sold to developing countries. If you concentrate on the rich countries where .mobi domains are most likely to be used, the proportion of smartphones is much higher, and growing all the time.

Bear in mind that most smartphones aren't sold AS smartphones, they usually look like a "normal" phone. People buy them as normal phones because that's how they're advertised.

Smartphone prices are dropping rapidly, you can buy a brand new smartphone model unlocked for about $250, or nothing at all if you buy it on a contract.

lexipixel




msg:3471248
 6:13 pm on Oct 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

Thanks for the actual translations -- my point in posting the translations for ".post" is that, while the topic was a universal postal union domain .tld, the entire world does not speak English, and that the term "postal" and in-turn ".post" does not seem to fill a universal need.

From the application for the sTLD:

"The .post sponsored Top Level Domain (sTLD) will be a trusted, stable, secure, innovative standard identifier of the postal community in cyberspace..."
- [icann.org...]

Further, the application goes on to describe:

The .post sTLD will be structured into 2 major logical sections, namely:
1a sub-domain structure reflecting each country's officially designated Post Operator (DPO) so that each sovereign entity will be able to manage the
allocation of domains within their territory, to register postal offices, post codes, national services and physical address, etc....."

My read on the whole thing is an attempt to corner the market for an "official" electronic delivered mail networking structure that the organization involved may be able to somehow profit or control the flow of "official" email --- and possibly cause people to have to pay for "electronic postage" to have their mail delivered.

If, as the application indicates there is some "need" for this to insure that "official" or approved postal entities can conduct business, then, just as ".gov" or ".mil" domains can not be bought or sold by commercial entities, then .post should not be either, (their application refers to 3rd level domains such as:


6. Function: registered partners
Membership: suppliers to the postal industry worldwide
Convention: .partner.post.
Examples: pitneybowes.partner.post, siemens.partner.post,
microsoft.partner.post, fedex.partner.post, ipc.partner.post

I don't see any benefit to anyone other than the registrars, (pretty much the consensus of others here). Any .post domains, if registered will probably just be shelved and forwarded to the commercial (.com) version, e.g.

"microsoft.partner.post" forwarded to "microsoft.com", (or some variation of "mail.microsoft.com").

HuskyPup




msg:3471445
 2:40 am on Oct 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

It won't be a question of people actively seeking PC-style browsers, they will simply come as standard even on the cheaper models. It will be very difficult NOT to buy a phone with a PC-style browser.

I do not disagree with this however the fact is that conforming to .mobi standards the site should always be displayed correctly and completely on the screen with only a vertical scroll whereas a standard web page will not normally display correctly without extensive scrolling both vertically AND horizontally ...an absolute pain in the butt if looking at more than a few pages.

Plus imagine trying to view a standard web page that has 1 mb index page of images! I saw one the other day with 7 mb...what!?

.mobi should be quick and simple, forget all the other garbage IMHO, and after all, they're not exactly expensive to buy:-)

Sorry, went slight off topic!

[edited by: HuskyPup at 2:41 am (utc) on Oct. 8, 2007]

mjwalshe




msg:3472868
 4:14 pm on Oct 9, 2007 (gmt 0)

re specialist tld's some are better that others.

Ok as some one who used to be one of the owners of the .coop registry I might be biased :-) Don't forget that in some countries around 70-80% of agriculture will be a co-op.

Btw KFC or part of it is a coop and could in theory go for chicken.coop ;-)

and DONT! get me started on ICAN'T

mjwalshe




msg:3472877
 4:22 pm on Oct 9, 2007 (gmt 0)

Ah just read further they are obviously trying to go for physical delivery - interesting this was part of X.400 Email standard but very few people actually did it (Sweden and predictably DBP I think trialed it)

It would rely on an X.500 directory to map emails to physical addresses.

Pity in some ways that the crappy smtp/rfc822 won out over OSI.

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