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.EU just got cheaper
Eurid is a non-profit, lowering prices to reduce cash in bank
Lisa




msg:3158180
 5:32 am on Nov 16, 2006 (gmt 0)

Eurid has sent advanced warning to all registrars that they will be reducing prices on all .EU domains effective January 1st. The price will drop from 10 Euros to 5 Euros. For those of you wondering if this makes sense, the logic behind it is simple. Eurid is tasked with being a non-profit. Simple fact is they are making too much money. The amount of people registering .EU domains continues to grow.

Seems like a good move! I wonder if people should wait for January or they should buy more now? Speculators can now buy twice as much. :)

 

jmccormac




msg:3159475
 5:14 am on Nov 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

Forgive me for being cynical, but I think that the collapse of .eu sales has been the key motivator for this move. The management of EURid are reviled through out the EU domain business as being completely incompetent. The .eu ccTLD has been plundered by non-EU cyberwarehousers and cybersquatters - all this was facilitated by EURid. As a ccTLD for the EU. .eu is a complete disaster. Based on my research, most of .eu websites are just parking pages and cyberwarehousing networks. The average European business is ignoring the TLD and I don't think that there has been one major .eu pureplay venture. Some very high profile US domain business people have been identified as being behind the UK front companies squatting thousands of .eu domains.

Then again EURid may be trying to distract attention from the court action against the Ovidio syndicate which is due to start this month.

Regards...jmcc

gpmgroup




msg:3159749
 12:03 pm on Nov 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

I think that the collapse of .eu sales has been the key motivator for this move

Has anyone been tracking reg numbers over time? Like they do for gTLDs like .com and .info etc?

jmccormac




msg:3159893
 3:05 pm on Nov 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

These are rough figures for .eu ccTLD over May-Nov 2006.

Monthly changes over May-Nov (16/11/2006)
Month: May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov
Active delta: 147,311 155,432 -2,352 78,283 68,348 150,278 37,880
Accepted delta: 19,071 18,648 18,347 17,689 17,829 16,922 16,721
Rejected delta: 6,373 6,120 5,688 5,520 5,511 5,166 5,221

The delta figures are those of the change between the first and last days of each month excepting November.

The July increase was wiped out by EURId putting around 74K of the Ovidio syndicate domains on hold. The October figures are inversely affected as the Ovidio domains were reactivated by EURid. The other important aspect is that the Accepted delta filters into the Active figure 40 days after the domains are accepted and this the real figures tend to be reduced by these residual Sunrise registrations.

From <snip> my own domain stats tracking site covering all major TLDs and about 40% of .co.uk) 01/October/2006 survey of .eu ccTLD, this is how .eu breaks down with approximately 81% of .eu checked:

1-99 domains - hosters: 35491 - total: 199695
100-999 domains - hosters: 851 - total: 254815
1000-9999 domains - hosters: 176 - total: 503629
10000-99999 domains - hosters: 21 - total: 574600
>100000 domains - hosters: 2 - total: 214987

The website breakdown was a bit alarming for any ccTLD - approximately 25% of .eu the websites were spread over just 15 IPs. That is a dire situation for any TLD because these are typically "coming soon", parked or PPC pages.

<Snip>

The 01/November/2006 figures will be up in the next day or so.

Regards...jmcc

[edited by: Webwork at 6:00 pm (utc) on Nov. 17, 2006]
[edit reason] Please: No personal blog hotlinks or referrals. Thank-you. [/edit]

jmccormac




msg:3160183
 7:44 pm on Nov 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

I checked the stats again in Excel as the spreadsheet program I used on Linux seemed to have a few import problems and some days in the dataset had new registrations and other sections that were negative.

Delta Active Accept Reject Exp Avg Daily
May-06 147311 24783 10345 8890 4910
Jun-06 155432 7119 9744 9744 5181
Jul-06 -2352 8586 5016 7 2373
Aug-06 78283 12446 4266 4 2525
Sep-06 68348 6317 14945 3 2278
Oct-06 150278 4537 11417 0 2399
Nov-06 39844 38 19 1 2344
Nov 06 figure current as of 20061117.

The Ovidio ON-HOLD domains account for the negative figure for July 2006 and the unusual increase in October as they were reactivated. Approximstely 75922 were deleted around the time that Eurid put the Ovidio syndicate domains on hold in July

Regards...jmcc

gpmgroup




msg:3160298
 9:23 pm on Nov 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

Great stats jmcc, thanks for sharing, things seem to have really declined - less than 2500 net registrations a day seems quite low.
(Especially as its the 1st year and deletions haven't started yet)

Do you think the halving of the wholesale price in January will have any impact to short term or long term (registration) rates?

jmccormac




msg:3160432
 12:31 am on Nov 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Great stats jmcc, thanks for sharing, things seem to have really declined - less than 2500 net registrations a day seems quite low.(Especially as its the 1st year and deletions haven't started yet)
It is downright scary. When you consider that .eu is supposed to be the ccTLD for a bunch of countries with two of the biggest ccTLDs in the world it should be doing a lot better. The blame for the disaster lies with the EC, EURid and PwC BE.

The busiest days for domain registrations seem to be the mini-landrush Tuesdays so in real terms it is worse than it appears. (Though some release dates are being spread out now.) These domains in these mini-landrushes are those where the jerks in PwC BE have decided that the applicants were not entitled to them. Many of these domains are subsequently squatted. The affected businesses are thinking twice about wasting nearly 2000 Euros on an ADR which is really just a high risk gamble on getting some kind of sentient panelist.

Do you think the halving of the wholesale price in January will have any impact to short term or long term (registration) rates?
It is like a firesale in the aftermath of nuclear bomb - great bargains but utterly toxic.

Some of the daily registrations now are protective (businesses etc) but there is a huge element of speculation. The price cut may encourage (or rather hosters will offer it as a special offer) business people to add a .eu to their domain list in the same way that they sometimes add the lesser gTLD versions of their primary domain. But the damage that the EC, EURid and PwC BE did to the crediblity of the ccTLD is just amazing. They have managed to exclude and alienate the core business element from the ccTLD in favour of squatters, speculators and warehousers. That loss of credibility will be very hard to repair.

There is a danger that the reduced price will encourage even more speculation - at a guess that might result in about 250K more registrations. But it is a race to the bottom. The collapse of .info followed a similar pattern with .info being virtually given away free - this may happen in late January.

The renewals rate will be critical. It may end up being in the region of 45% or less as many of the more speculative registrants realise that the .eu domains they've registered are dross rather than gold. The cyberwarehousers and cybersquatters with their bogus registrars will probably hold on to their domains - the reduced fee immediately benefits them and this may encourage them to register more.

The long term for .eu is dodgy. It could take at least five years for the problems to work their way out of the TLD but without any real action to protect the integrity of the TLD from the speculators, squatters and warehousers, the .eu is a failed TLD. It might end up with about 3 million domains registered after a few years (after the massive renewal cull next year) but it may also, perhaps more realistically, end up with just around 1 million domains registered by this time next year.

The management of EURid are idiots if they think that classic landrush registration behaviour makes the 2.4M domains registered a success. After every landrush, TLDs shrink. Even .com shrunk in the aftermath of the dot.bomb as wildly speculative domains were dropped in droves. I think .eu will be worse because it had the capability to be great. Now it is just a speculative long shot.

Regards...jmcc

gpmgroup




msg:3160999
 5:38 pm on Nov 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

The busiest days for domain registrations seem to be the mini-landrush Tuesdays so in real terms it is worse than it appears.

Taking the September figures as example (Last complete month w/o the 75,000 names from the legal case)

New regs 68,348
Accepted 17,829
Rejected 5,511

Am I right in assuming

This means the 17,829 are part of the 68,348 names rather than in addition to?
So the actual "new" registrations rather than delayed ones are actually around 1700 a day?

And the majority of the rejected 5,511 names are simply grabbed by domainers on "dropping"?

inbound




msg:3161016
 6:00 pm on Nov 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

.eu is dead in the water for the following reasons(amongst others):

The general public have no idea it exists.

Generic .eu names were/are unavailable to enterprising companies/individuals who want to develop sites on them (due to the poor policing), so people won't see many new companies spring up with .eu as their main address.

The public will also not see many established companies using .eu, hence growth in public awareness will take a LONG time.

It's easier to pick up a good .com/.cctld on the aftermarket than take a punt on an unknown extension.

jmccormac




msg:3161087
 8:32 pm on Nov 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Taking the September figures as example (Last complete month w/o the 75,000 names from the legal case)
The revised figures are (second stats post above):
Sep-06
Active change :68348
Accepted change: 6317
Rejected change: 14945
Expired change:3
Daily Average: 2278

The Active change includes new registrations, the accepted domains coming out of their 40 day pre-activation period and dropcatches. The sunrise applications accepted in September would not enter the active count until 40 days later. So appoximately, those domains accepted in July would be coming into the active count in September. The rejected domains in September could potentially be entering the active count as they are included in the mini-landrushes.

EURid doesn't really make the figures clear. Most of the accepted domains would be in the active count with the newly accepted domains gradually making their way into the figure. The interesting thing is the rejected figure as these now account for many of the new registrations as they are released.

And the majority of the rejected 5,511 names are simply grabbed by domainers on "dropping"?
The September rejection figures seem to be high and this would probably be PwC BE making a complete hames of the UK/IE company and business names applications. Again the release of these rejected figures (14945) will be staggered over the next few months but it would not be surprising to see many of them snapped up by squatters. Some businesses will be lucky and will get their domains.

Regards...jmcc

gpmgroup




msg:3161121
 9:22 pm on Nov 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Thanks again jmcc,

When do you expect the rejected applications to cease?
Seven months seems a long time especially for the registrants.

moltar




msg:3161161
 10:49 pm on Nov 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I haven't seen a single .eu site to date, and I do pay attention to domains!

OptiRex




msg:3161240
 12:49 am on Nov 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

jmccormac, thanks for the great info.

Some of the daily registrations now are protective (businesses etc)

Very true, we did exactly that but didn't get our own company name thanks to the squatters.

but there is a huge element of speculation.

Undoubtedly however there are some great names still available. I've registered some English language ones recently that will probably never appear on the com/net/org/biz/info/co.uk market.

That loss of credibility will be very hard to repair.

Maybe so amongst domainers however businesses may take a different approach. A quality company site on a .eu is not a reason not to visit that site and, for a European, looks good on a letterhead etc.

Interestingly, bear in mind my business is importing/exporting and not domaining, the reaction by exisiting and potential clients at exhibitions etc, has been very positive when they've seen our companyname.eu plastered on every bit of adware we have.

It's created an interest factor, for how long I have no idea but as a long-term extension, I wouldn't sell any of mine, the names are just too good.

The management of EURid are idiots

I agree, they handled it unbelievably badly and it is very evident simply by the lack of total registrations by Europeans.

jmccormac, do you know what proportion of domains registered were by language, not by country?

There seemed to be an enormous quantity of German generic words registered, some almost non-sensical German words IMO.

The biggest problem .eu faces is that probably most companies who are pan-European/multiple Euro language, they are most likely probably already well-established and have no necessity to convert their existing sites to a .eu. I do know many who are simply redirecting/parking on top, their .eu's to their principal sites.

The madness in all this .eu farce is that they actually had the potential to sell the extension to every EU business...quite simply they screwed it up since they appointed amateurs who know nothing about business.

Another Brussels/EU fiasco...their incompetence continues...

jmccormac




msg:3161519
 3:28 pm on Nov 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

When do you expect the rejected applications to cease?
Seven months seems a long time especially for the registrants.
Well EURid were claiming that all the sunrise apps would be processed by Christmas so it might be April 2007 before all the rejected applications make their way into the market. Setting such a low threshold (apparently 1000 applications to be processed a day) was insanely stupid but then the morons in EURid had no real world experience of running what is in effect a gTLD. Running a minor ccTLD (many of the EURid people seem to be ex-DNS.be) is just not the same thing.

Regards...jmcc

jmccormac




msg:3161598
 4:59 pm on Nov 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

Very true, we did exactly that but didn't get our own company name thanks to the squatters.
A very high number of EU businesses lost their .eu domains to squatters. The bungling by EURid and PwC BE over the UK/IE company and business names has really screwed the ccTLD as these business registrations (as opposed to personal) form the core of any credible TLD. These are the SMEs and one man multinationals that are the bedrock of a ccTLD.

Undoubtedly however there are some great names still available. I've registered some English language ones recently that will probably never appear on the com/net/org/biz/info/co.uk market.
Agreed. But the fact that these domains are still available points to a drop in value (for domainers) for the .eu ccTLD. The domainer activity is a good indication as to the overall health of an unmanaged ccTLD.

Maybe so amongst domainers however businesses may take a different approach. A quality company site on a .eu is not a reason not to visit that site and, for a European, looks good on a letterhead etc.
It has a certain rarity value. :)

Interestingly, bear in mind my business is importing/exporting and not domaining, the reaction by exisiting and potential clients at exhibitions etc, has been very positive when they've seen our companyname.eu plastered on every bit of adware we have.
But that would already be a more diverse market (one used to piles of confusing ccTLDs in addition to the gTLDs) and a single .eu would simplify the contact process. This is exactly the best function for a .eu domain. It is when it gets into the highly competitive EU ccTLD market that it falters. The EURid marketing (which was completely forgettable) didn't seem to know if it was fish or fowl. The Irish ccTLD (.ie) had a similarly bad marketing problem - people here automatically assumed the .com extension for a domain name. It took years for the .ie to be accepted and almost every advertised website on TV has a .ie (apart from the obvious big brand names such as Aer Lingus, Ryanair and Eircom which rely on .com and .net). Though the market for Aer Lingus and Ryanair (airlines) are more global. Perhaps the ccTLDs have got the EU market locked up and instead of competing with them, it has ended up competing with .com in a battle it cannot win.

do you know what proportion of domains registered were by language, not by country?
I haven't managed to sort everything on languages yet OptiRex. These are sorted on hoster nationalities with the main countries listed and some interesting counties added:
Top 10:
.eu cty
534797 DE (Biggest genuine interest but a lot of speculation)
203564 US (Mixed - genuine/cyberwarehousing/squats)
186547 NL
113770 UK (Vastly different to EURid's figure because of UK front companies)
106274 FR
91684 IT
65134 CY (Primarily the Ovidio syndicate with about 12K genuine CY registrations.)
51541 AU (Fabulous.com monetization and some squatters)
50277 CZ
47455 RO (Squatter/Cyberwarehousing operation accounts for at least 44K.)

----
5881 CN (Primarily a well known Chinese squatter - 5622 .eu identified.)
2519 KR (Unusual numbers of Korean regs)
1529 AG
1204 BG
1063 VN

The biggest problem .eu faces is that probably most companies who are pan-European/multiple Euro language, they are most likely probably already well-established and have no necessity to convert their existing sites to a .eu. I do know many who are simply redirecting/parking on top, their .eu's to their principal sites.
And many of these hub sites will redirect to the relevant ccTLD site in that market's local language. This means that it would be looking to the pioneers to build new sites after the landrush and create .eu pureplays. Unfortunately, they've gone elsewhere because of the bungling of the morons in the EC and EURid.

The madness in all this .eu farce is that they actually had the potential to sell the extension to every EU business...quite simply they screwed it up since they appointed amateurs who know nothing about business.
I'd really like to find out the names of these "experts" who advised the EC on this because of the mess it has made. One simple directive and every business could have had their .eu domain - an absolutely massive market created in seconds. And choosing a bunch of mickey mouse operators to run what is effective a gTLD is almost beyond belief. Did they choose these morons because they were just down the road?

Well it hasn't done the EU's reputation for incompetence and waste any good. DEnic was in the running for this as was, I think, Afilias. These are operations that have far more experience and competence when it comes to running large TLDs. But the EC chose the primarily Belgian (DNS.be) bid. Who was on the committee that made the decision? Were they competent to make the right choice? The answer to the second question, given the mess the bozos in EURid and PwC BE has made of .eu, is obvious.

Regards...jmcc

OptiRex




msg:3162050
 3:11 am on Nov 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

One simple directive and every business could have had their .eu domain - an absolutely massive market created in seconds.

Just why is it that you and I, and probably everyone else reading this thread, can see and understand that, yet the idiots who were appointed could not see nor comprehend the potential?

How many businesses are there across the EU, I have no idea but it must be 20/30 million, maybe more?

There are some 2.3 million or so UK registered at companies house and that's without all the self-employed. Ok, we know that many are shelf-companies etc however if it is similar across the EU I'll bet my figures are not far wrong.

Yay, yay, yay, yay, yay...did they screw-up or what?

Please, no one launch any more extensions without talking to us first:-)

hakanhaknuz




msg:3172374
 5:54 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

[quote]These domains in these mini-landrushes are those where the jerks in PwC BE have decided that the applicants were not entitled to them. Many of these domains are subsequently squatted. The affected businesses are thinking twice about wasting nearly 2000 Euros on an ADR which is really just a high risk gamble on getting some kind of sentient panelist. [/quotes]
Ooh so true , you must have read my mind! Did you also noticed where the court is settled (I ask myself why in the hell did they choose a coutry where corruption is thriving.)?
[quote]I haven't seen a single .eu site to date, and I do pay attention to domains! [/quotes]
But I do have a multiple succesfull .eu domainnames without parking pages on them. I shall not post them here because i think it's against the rules of webmasterworld, but when you're interested send me a pm and i will show you examples.

It's very well formulated by former posters,i sympathise with (and recognise) their views. But since i do believe .eu can be a succes now that the landrush is over( and maybe a change of employees/management and rules at eurid and pwc be in the future)
i would like to emphasize again the start of this topic.
A 50 % discount on every .eu name for registrars. THIS IS A GREAT INCENTEVE when registrars pass thiss discount on to their customers

hakanhaknuz




msg:3172421
 6:19 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

Sorry for this double post my computer crashed..I cannot edit the former one regretfully.
I wanted to mention that the .eu still can be saved with this 50%discount WHEN IT GOES TO THE CLIENTS of the registrars!
-It was already mentioned that domainers don't see money in it and that could be a reason why non-domainers still can get a desired .eu.
-This discount should be mainly a stimuli for non-domainers! (Domainers especially the kind involved in the .eu trade don't have to watch every penny, cause they have millions). Eurid should make this clear to every registrar.
-The .eu extension really has the potential of becoming the .com of europe! There are new generations on the rise, there are new companies starting everyday, most of them will need a domainname and what can the choose (not a .com because likely it will be registered, so Eurid make .eu their most wanted alternative!)
-Maybe Eurid can fix there sunrise mistakes, by reviewing every denied sunrise applicant again by a (real)independent and (real)qualified party. Sending out appologies to every company wrongly rejected).
-Well there are many more but i stick with these for now!

inbound




msg:3172753
 10:26 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

There is no way to roll the mistakes back, we're stuck with a lame duck.

In this case I support .EUthanasia

hakanhaknuz




msg:3174674
 10:43 am on Dec 1, 2006 (gmt 0)

Of course it can, negative nay saying people are always there, when beseen from postive points of view there are many options how you can turn this negative .eu imago into a positive one.
I already mentioned some points, but there are more things that can be done to restore faith in .eu.
I my case the only real problem i have with .eu, was the sunrise registration and the fact that I was rejected for my valid business name(for wich i have all the nessecary rights), but this is to blame on Price Waterhouse and Coopers and indirect the eurid managament staff.

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