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.eu passes 2 million names mark
Germany #1
OptiRex




msg:3002758
 4:43 pm on Jul 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

Despite what has been said they're still registering names!

[status.eurid.eu...]

1. Germany - 639,791
2. UK - 368,380
3. Netherlands - 241,414
4. Italy - 118,900
5. France - 113,879

Considering that France and Italy are both very similar with population to the UK, there doesn't see to be so much enthusiasm from them for their .eu identities.

 

TinkyWinky




msg:3002778
 4:54 pm on Jul 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

I think they are a dead duck already... most of those numbers are squatters trying to hype up the 'usefulness' of this domain and to make themselves some easy money by conning people.

Webwork




msg:3002922
 6:27 pm on Jul 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

I haven't registered or attempted to register a .EU domain. My gut tells me that .EU may ultimately prove to be "too much of a good thing": too broad in its application to prove its merit in most cases.

My thinking, in part, is the uncertainty of the domain message: Are you saying that your business reach is pan-European? You have offices all across the EU? You welcome people from across the EU? (If you're part of the EU do you really have a choice?)

Now, for pan-European issues some of the keyword domain names (trade, travel, law, etc.) it may make perfect sense, at least to the degree that a website addresses EU policy, rules, regulations, etc. Perhaps businesses that span the EU. Otherwise I'm a doubting Thomas about the vitality of the TLD.

So, now I see 2 million registrations in the first few months. I'll write off 30-40% of those to utter silly land grabs: Word domains of little real appeal, opportunity excites the mind type action. "Better get it before someone else does."

I'll venture that 10% of the registration may qualify as "defense of brand".

I'll guess that another 10% reflect some effort to sort out the future with some measure of business logic.

So, maybe I'm off a bit on my first number? Maybe it's not 30-40%, but more like 80% of the initial flurry that are likely to lapse in the next 2 years?

2 million domains: What percent make applied business sense?

What use or application does a .EU domain name make sense for? Given your statement or analysis then what percentage of the registrations do you think will survive? 10%?

[edited by: Webwork at 6:31 pm (utc) on July 11, 2006]

OptiRex




msg:3002954
 6:46 pm on Jul 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

Given your statement or analysis then what percentage of the registrations do you think will survive? 10%?

Interestingly Eurid itself states "no one anticipated these high numbers".

Considering that 50% of registrations have been since the free-for-all what percentage of those will continue? 10% would be very low in my guesstimation since many of those have presumably been bought with a purpose in mind even if it is only:

"defense of brand"

Of the original domain squatters how long will they wait?

Some .com's are still for sale 7-8 years after they were first registered and placed on Sedo etc therefore some of these guys must have very deep pockets and patience.

Personally my 18 registrations are all up and running and in the SERPs and just need to be developed further over the ensuing months when I find the time.

I'm at a massive trade fair in Italy in October so it will be interesting to see how many of the 1,500 exhibitors are using the extension.

gibbergibber




msg:3003157
 9:32 pm on Jul 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

My thinking, in part, is the uncertainty of the domain message: Are you saying that your business reach is pan-European? You have offices all across the EU? You welcome people from across the EU? (If you're part of the EU do you really have a choice?)

I could see at least one major application: online stores which are based within countries that use the Euro currency.

There are a dozen countries that use the Euro, with more on the waiting list to join, yet shops like Amazon still continue to have totally separate sites for major Eurozone countries (Amazon Germany, Amazon France etc), with smaller Eurozone countries totally uncovered. Surely it would make sense to unify them all under an Amazon.eu banner?

Language can't be a problem, Amazon Canada is already bilingual, and import taxes can't be a problem either because there are no import taxes within the EU (that's the basic point of a trading union after all!). Sales tax isn't a problem either as their software automatically adds the appropriate percentage depending on the recipient's address within the EU (I've tried this, it works), and varying levels of state sales tax is something the American Amazon website has to cope with too.

It would make Amazon able to advertise its site with one brand and one address across the ever-expanding Eurozone instead of splintering its European audience across half a dozen sites. Amazon.eu would have as many potential customers as Amazon.com, and they'd all be effectively ordering from (in tax terms) the same country using the same currency.

rohitj




msg:3003306
 11:45 pm on Jul 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

You don't have to have deep pockets to squat. I was under the impression that one could put down a 100k security deposit with ICann become a registrar and then register domains for .25 a year. Throw on adsense or a landing page with a private-label PPC engine and you've made up the cost. You then wait and hope that 5 to 6 percent of the domains get sold to businesses and individuals who want the name.

TinkyWinky




msg:3005216
 7:52 am on Jul 13, 2006 (gmt 0)

You don't have to have deep pockets to squat. I was under the impression that one could put down a 100k security deposit with ICann become a registrar and then register domains for .25 a year. Throw on adsense or a landing page with a private-label PPC engine and you've made up the cost. You then wait and hope that 5 to 6 percent of the domains get sold to businesses and individuals who want the name.

Exactly what's wrong with the whole system IMHO.

jmccormac




msg:3005268
 8:43 am on Jul 13, 2006 (gmt 0)

I haven't registered or attempted to register a .EU domain. My gut tells me that .EU may ultimately prove to be "too much of a good thing": too broad in its application to prove its merit in most cases.
It could be more like a me-too gTLD than too much of a good thing. But there was never any proof that it would be a good thing. And handing it over to the smurfs in Eurid was a recipe for disaster - these people had never run a gTLD and the servers fell over on the first day of the landrush. And as for the dodgy Benelux trademarks and the ADR - this was a great example in how not to run a gTLD.

My thinking, in part, is the uncertainty of the domain message: Are you saying that your business reach is pan-European? You have offices all across the EU? You welcome people from across the EU? (If you're part of the EU do you really have a choice?)
I'm Irish first and a European second. I'd expect that British people would be British first and European second, ditto for the French, Germans, Italians and the rest of the EU. Local marketing deserves a local domain. And given that most people in Europe probably associate the EU and the European Commission with corruption and bureaucracy, a .eu domain isn't really the selling point that these EC/Eurid people think that it is.

Now, for pan-European issues some of the keyword domain names (trade, travel, law, etc.) it may make perfect sense, at least to the degree that a website addresses EU policy, rules, regulations, etc. Perhaps businesses that span the EU. Otherwise I'm a doubting Thomas about the vitality of the TLD.
It might have been a lot easier to reserve .eu as a regulatory gTLD for EU use? That sounds like a far better use of the .eu - when there is a single EU identity, then that would be the time to open it up.

So, now I see 2 million registrations in the first few months. I'll write off 30-40% of those to utter silly land grabs: Word domains of little real appeal, opportunity excites the mind type action. "Better get it before someone else does."
I think that 30-40% is very conservative. Try 60-80%. Most of the .eu domains are never going to be used or will end up as linkswamp pages with PPC advertising.

I'll venture that 10% of the registration may qualify as "defense of brand".
Potentially. Though the sheer incompetence of the sunrise phases means that any benefit that these businesses would have had to launch a .eu in the midst of the .eu hype has been lost. The smurfs in Eurid totally underestimated the number of domain applications to be checked and many companies might not even see their domain go live until Christmas or even next year. The core of any gTLD is its business users. Without that credibility, it is not business friendly and can easily be painted as a squatter's paradise.

So, maybe I'm off a bit on my first number? Maybe it's not 30-40%, but more like 80% of the initial flurry that are likely to lapse in the next 2 years?
More in line with what I expect to see happen.

2 million domains: What percent make applied business sense?
Look at the sunrise phase applications and divide by 10? Then look at the 301s to the real websites and you may have a figure for defensive registrations.

The .eu gTLD is such a mess that it is difficult to make any reliable predictions. Right now, it is looking like another .biz or .info gTLD.

Regards...jmcc

jmccormac




msg:3005271
 8:50 am on Jul 13, 2006 (gmt 0)

Considering that France and Italy are both very similar with population to the UK, there doesn't see to be so much enthusiasm from them for their .eu identities.
I'd say that most of the UK registrations are bogus (mainly non-EU) registrars using front companies to squat large numbers of .eu domains. The figures for other EU countries, Cyprus for example, are similarly skewed.

Regards...jmcc

OptiRex




msg:3005542
 1:36 pm on Jul 13, 2006 (gmt 0)

If the massive non-renewal were to happen would that mean that a substantial number of quality names would appear?

I've seen a whole load of German language .eu's for sale and many of them are for the most obscure terms imaginable, if these were not sold quickly then I could envisage a mass dumping, however the good quality names/terms etc will surely create a good market of their own?

What I really do not comprehend is that the one .eu I really wanted, my company name, is not being used for anything, not on a re-direct and not even for sale anywhere.

What does anyone gain from this? Or am I missing a fundamental point here?

rohitj

I was under the impression that one could put down a 100k security deposit with ICann become a registrar and then register domains for .25 a year.

I have no idea whether this is correct or not but it is still a substantial amount of money to have laid dormant. I certainly know how to make money faster than wait and hope!

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