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CMS after site finished?

     
7:54 pm on Feb 4, 2017 (gmt 0)

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I'm looking for a CMS or other program that I can install that will allow clients to update their site after creating it with an editor. The only one I found was jdcms, but that is so out of date that it nearly useless. Anyone have any thoughts or am I stuck making the site with a cms?

Thanks!
2:25 am on Feb 5, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Can you define "update their site after creating it with an editor?"

You mean you want to create it in a text editor or something like Dreamweaver and then have it managed by a CMS after launch?

You could pretty easily add editing capability using a script and some AJAXy stuff that would simply suck a whole portion of the page in (either the <body> or the <section> that includes content), but that does not a CMS make.

A full-fledged CMS is going to manage links, navigation, media, etc.

This thread would probably interest you, but I don't think anything there will truly fit your needs

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4:31 pm on Feb 6, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Thanks! So I'm guessing that there really isn't anything available; so the next best thing would be a WYSIWYG editor.
9:25 pm on Feb 6, 2017 (gmt 0)

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You could create a system where, once the user authenticates, there are edit links for the body and the nav and then you use some sort of templating system to put the final page together and pull in the nav.

I did something like this... a long time ago. The one thing about it is that because the tech is so simple, it actually was still running after almost 15 years with no updates. It's probably insecure as all getout, because I only had the slightest clue about sanitizing input in PHP when I built it, but I built it for free as fast as I could for an organization I didn't even belong to anymore and it singlehandedly took them from a big operating deficit to back in the black (because it included a reservations system and they could hound people who reserved and then didn't pay, which was happening a lot - the site does not take money... that would give me nightmares).
5:40 pm on Feb 7, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Thanks for the idea. I've often thought about making my own CMS, but never actually gave it a go. At this point, I would have to charge them for the time it would take to put it together and they were already getting antsy about costs.
5:46 pm on Feb 7, 2017 (gmt 0)

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If the site structure is unlikely to change, you could have the content drawn from a database, and provide an admin area where the site owner can login and make any required edits. If the pages are static... Home, Contact, About etc etc this could work out well.

Mack.
6:58 pm on Feb 7, 2017 (gmt 0)

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>>I've often thought about making my own CMS, but never actually gave it a go

I just don't see that. I made my own CMS at one point because I didn't like anything out there, but that was in the late 1990s and early-2000s. Now there are so many options from heavy to light, from hosted to frameworks that do little out of the box.

I just don't believe an individual is going to improve on that and as client I would never go for it, because I'm locked into that contractor now.
7:53 am on Feb 17, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Technically a CMS is not much use once a site has already been built, it's a building tool. In fact one could argue that the CMS itself becomes a liability on a "finished" site that will not see new content or will only have infrequent updates.

A simple php file, combined with solid use of .htaccess, is more than capable of handling all of a website's functions without a CMS, Database or any other help.

example 1: You could easily take a completed wordpress website and convert each page into a static HTML copy and remove wordpress, and it's database, completely.

example 2: You could easily create a single simple php template file and, using a flat file structure, place all of the article textual content in a second text file, and then call on the content from the text file to the php file based on URL. .htaccess makes it easy to do.

Both methods are fairly straight forward, the first simply replicates what a cache already does while the second is more dynamic but also requires no CMS or database. A user would never know the difference, except for a likely sizeable increase in page speed.

Making modifications at a later date is also simple, some text editors are capable of performing a task on all opened pages(for example 1) and in the second example all of the textual content(icluding links, html, image url etc if any) is in a single reference file. Search - replace - upload as many urls at a time as you wish.

.htaccess is definitely worth mastering, especially rewrites(instead of redirects), if you'd like to retire the CMS on completed sites to enjoy the added speed and security and reduced maintenance hassle benefits.

p.s. the magic in example 2 happens when you display content from one file inside of the other file via rewrite. Taking content from example.php(which only contains the main article content) to display in example.html(which has all of the template, css, javascript etc), for example.

Tip: If you plan to eventually convert a site to static and retire it's CMS start out by using 3rd party services for things like comment sections. Reason: simply placing the comment javascript most 3rd party comment systems provide into your main template file will eliminate the need to store comments, update code etc. Discus, Facebook etc all provide javascript to insert for comment boxes, it works on a static or simply dynamic flatfile reliant page too.
8:13 am on Feb 17, 2017 (gmt 0)

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At this point, I would have to charge them for the time it would take to put it together and they were already getting antsy about costs.


What is the end goal? You set up the domain, whois, all that icky stuff, provide a layout and a few pages THEN turn it over to them to flesh out?

Don't worry about a CMS. Just give them a template they can use, simple instructions, then walk away and wait for their phone call for you to fix up what they messed up.

Popular CMS systems are magnets for script kiddies and hackers --- you would NOT be doing your client any favors setting up something that needs regular patching etc. if they do not have in-house web savvy foils.

There are few to NO shortcuts. A nervous client needs to be reassured AND educated on how things work and that's often the hardest job when working as a web coder. Been there, done that, ad nauserum!
8:37 pm on Feb 17, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Thanks!
5:42 am on Feb 20, 2017 (gmt 0)

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In fact one could argue that the CMS itself becomes a liability on a "finished" site that will not see new content or will only have infrequent updates.


Indeed. By far the more common request in this forum is, "Now that the site is built, can I convert to static?"