homepage Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.167.11.16
register, free tools, login, search, pro membership, help, library, announcements, recent posts, open posts,
Become a Pro Member

Home / Forums Index / WebmasterWorld / Content, Writing and Copyright
Forum Library, Charter, Moderators: not2easy

Content, Writing and Copyright Forum

    
Content Writing Suggestion and Tips
suggestions for professional way of content writing
RamaKrishna




msg:3657238
 11:06 am on May 23, 2008 (gmt 0)

As Content plays major role in ranking of web sites in search engines and aslo for customer conversion. Please provide some suggestions and tips for professional way of content writing.

 

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:3657258
 11:24 am on May 23, 2008 (gmt 0)

It's dead easy ;)

If you mean that you are doing it by yourself then the first requirement would be that you know what you are talking about and can write about it in a way that people (and search engines) will find interesting.

rogerd




msg:3657600
 5:20 pm on May 23, 2008 (gmt 0)

I suggest hunting down some good references on "Writing for the Web." Effective Web writing is different than what works in print. Less dense copy, more bullets and headlines, and appropriate linkage can keep a visitor engaged longer than screens of gray text. Shorter sentence structure, simple words, and other measures may also help keep your copy readable and engaging.

SEO considerations include use of appropriate keywords and related vocabulary, page length, and more. Sometimes tradeoffs may be necessary if SEO needs butt up against usability.

old_expat




msg:3658519
 8:16 am on May 25, 2008 (gmt 0)

If you can somehow grab the reader's attention .. it's a good start.

"DeBeer's Evicts Bushmen, Yet Champions Democracy?"

Basically, I just made a promise. I promised my readership something .. so now I have to deliver.

We saw Leonards DiCaprio fight his way across Sierra Leone for a "Blood Diamond" worth a small fortune. And you probably know that DeBeers finally took a stand on "Conflict Diamonds".

DeBeers claims that the indidenous Bushmen left their ancestral lands voluntarily. That's pretty convenient if you are DeBeers and want to mine an estimated $ 2 trillion in diamonds.

Hypocracy? Nicky Oppenheimer gives a "Diamonds, Development and Democracy" lecture at Oxford. ...


D_Blackwell




msg:3664519
 2:30 am on Jun 2, 2008 (gmt 0)

that people (and search engines) will find interesting.

SEO considerations include use of appropriate keywords and related vocabulary, page length, and more. Sometimes tradeoffs may be necessary if SEO needs butt up against usability.

Writing for the internet is much different that writing for print.

1. Don't be Faulkner. Write for Google first, then the reader. They can't read it if they can't find it. That means giving up the flow of the language that you might prefer, in order to increase keyword density that Google will consider in assessing what the page is about.

2. People don't read webpages like books or magazines. You can impart a lot of information, but break it up. Shorter paragraphs. Headers that will identify specific sub-subjects within the whole.

3. Add images to help break up the page, so that it doesn't look like one long tract.

4. Use 'white space' to help break up the text. Bullets were suggested; a good option. <dl> can be handy for creating white space, opening up the page, and still presenting a good amount of information.

5. Break the subject into multiple pages, sub-pages so to speak with links to them from the main page. This will allow you to more easily present the 'big picture' on the main page, yet offer greater detail on the sub-pages for people looking for the most information possible.

6. The user can't read what they can't find - and they won't read huge chunks of text on a webpage. Thought to this comes first; before a single word is written.

elsovidiu




msg:3665163
 8:06 pm on Jun 2, 2008 (gmt 0)

Those are indeed beautiful tips, if I may say so, proving that not all of the useful things come in pairs of five or ten.

I'd like to add that the first part of the text should secure the goodwill of the recipient -- the bot (keyword density) and the human reader (catchphrases --in text, colors --in images or in text decoration).

A good text secures the goodwill of the recipient in all of its fragments.

Whenever you consider that the text is "weak" and may draw the attention of the human reader towards something else, you could embed an image, an image-ad or a call to action.

All speeches start off by securing the goodwill of the auditors and I think that web text should also rely on that.

Harry08




msg:3678381
 9:07 am on Jun 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

Writing for the internet is much different that writing for print.

Any suggestions to make a site with abandant content in a short time, 2 months, for instance?

SEO Content Provider




msg:3715318
 3:16 am on Aug 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

"1. Don't be Faulkner. Write for Google first, then the reader. They can't read it if they can't find it. That means giving up the flow of the language that you might prefer, in order to increase keyword density that Google will consider in assessing what the page is about."

I disagree slightly with this suggestion. Yes, you need to write for Google but this doesn't mean you have to sacrifice the quality and flow of the writing for human eyes. You can have the best SEO-friendly copy around but if it reads poorly when a human gets to your site, you'll soon turn off your visitors and they won't come back.

Use long tail keywords and organic SEO throughout your content - you can have a high SEO rated page and still read like just another offline page.

tangor




msg:3715535
 10:44 am on Aug 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

I'd suggest a class in journalism. That "WHO WHAT WHERE WHY AND HOW" with an emphasis on HOW is best results. Write it yourself. Keep it short and high on "buzz words". Save bucks. If you can't write it then hire reasonably to keep costs down.

glennk




msg:3762882
 1:11 pm on Oct 10, 2008 (gmt 0)

Write for Google first, then the reader. They can't read it if they can't find it.

I arent sure this is such great advice. In many senses it sounds true but the one thing to remember is that google wont list it if it hasnt been read by the public and endorsed (through links from your readers). Basically if your readers dont endorse it (like if its utter rubbish) then google wont list.

I would advise to write with your site visitors in mind. Feed google all the usual on page optimisation, but make sure the content is for your visitor. Avoid keyowrd stuffing and all that balony too.

Content can make or break you but its your readers views of your content that will ultimately decide what google does. Rubbish content = No links = No google.

erothchild




msg:3764304
 4:45 am on Oct 13, 2008 (gmt 0)

i would have to agree with Glen that you should always have the user in mind. My reasoning is that on 'page' is fairly easy to add after the fact and that this is your chance to make a first impression of sorts to your user. If you give a bad or 'so so' impression of your company/site after getting them there, you may lose the chance to do it again.

Personally, i think of the first page under a main topic as a landing page so it's all geared toward response, but i almost always add 2 to 3 well researched informational pages for those that want more information.

Global Options:
 top home search open messages active posts  
 

Home / Forums Index / WebmasterWorld / Content, Writing and Copyright
rss feed

All trademarks and copyrights held by respective owners. Member comments are owned by the poster.
Home ¦ Free Tools ¦ Terms of Service ¦ Privacy Policy ¦ Report Problem ¦ About ¦ Library ¦ Newsletter
WebmasterWorld is a Developer Shed Community owned by Jim Boykin.
© Webmaster World 1996-2014 all rights reserved