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How Often Should I Add Articles
One a day or in small groups?
TimmyMagic




msg:3378434
 5:52 pm on Jun 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

Hi,

I now have around 30 original articles, with 20 on the website at the moment, and about 30 more in the process of being written (by my writer).

I would like to know what is the best way to add them to the website. I have been adding them in groups of 5 each Monday. Is it better to add one a day or does it not really matter?

The purpose of the articles is to create content and hopefully increase search engine rankings.

 

ogletree




msg:3378439
 5:58 pm on Jun 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

I have never had any problems adding lots of content. If you are really concerned about this you can watch your log files and see when gbot gets all the new articles and then post more. Link the new ones on your front page. When you add more change the front page to link to the new ones. That will get them spidered quicker.

TimmyMagic




msg:3378457
 6:10 pm on Jun 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

That's it you see, I have a section on the site which is on every page and says '5 Newest Articles'. So adding 5 at a time is less time consuming because I only have to update this once every 5, rather than doing them one at a time.

I will check out my logs. Thanks for the advice.

ogletree




msg:3378683
 10:13 pm on Jun 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

It is a good idea to have a sitemap as well.

TimmyMagic




msg:3379003
 9:57 am on Jun 26, 2007 (gmt 0)

Yes I have a html sitemap and an xml sitemap. It's much easier updating these five pages at a time too.

I've not been able to check my logs as I don't know how to do this with cPanel, but I am looking into it. However in my stats it says that googlebot has visited 166 times in June.

dragsterboy




msg:3379063
 11:52 am on Jun 26, 2007 (gmt 0)

Personally speaking it would be good if you post an article every 3/4 days. That wouldn't be a problem.

TimmyMagic




msg:3379264
 3:39 pm on Jun 26, 2007 (gmt 0)

Personally speaking it would be good if you post an article every 3/4 days. That wouldn't be a problem.

Why do you think this is better than adding 5 at a time, once per week? I'm interested to know. Because for me it is less work to add them in small groups, but if there is any logical reason to do it a different way then I will.

Tim

ogletree




msg:3379313
 4:25 pm on Jun 26, 2007 (gmt 0)

There is no evidence that adding a lot of content at one time can hurt a site if the content is of high quality.

Grandmas Cookies




msg:3380180
 1:08 pm on Jun 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

Agreed. It won't hurt your site, but what's the point anyway?

ccDan




msg:3380623
 8:53 pm on Jun 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

Why do you think this is better than adding 5 at a time, once per week? I'm interested to know. Because for me it is less work to add them in small groups, but if there is any logical reason to do it a different way then I will.

I think it's better to spread them out than to post a bunch at once. Just for the sake of getting visitors to return to your site.

But, that may depend on your type of visitor too. Some may not mind visiting a site once a week and reading several articles. Others may prefer to visit several times a week and read one article at a time.

Do you use any kind of CMS? On my site, I can enter one or several articles at a time, and have them published on certain days, as I specify. I can set an article to be published five years from now, if I wanted to. I have one site that will have new content every day, and I only have to update it once a year. That will, naturally, depend on whether the content is time sensitive or not.

TimmyMagic




msg:3380672
 9:42 pm on Jun 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

I don't use any CMS - just plain out HTML using dreamweaver templates.

Visitors to the site aren't necessarily coming for the articles as the site is primarily a product based store. The articles are for SEO purposes but also to add value to the customer - as they are all related to the subject of the products.

So from a visitor point of view, there is no real need to add them one at a time. And for me it is easier to add them in groups of five. But I wanted to know whether this is not a good idea for SEO purposes, and it seems it doesn't really make a difference.

Therefore I think I'll probably stick to adding the new articles in groups of five. When I get near the end of the current batch of articles then I will probably add them one at a time.

Thanks for all your comments.

trooper27




msg:3386852
 12:28 pm on Jul 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

I think that if one has something to say to his/her readers then he/she should post the story. And if the case is that the new thing is things, like 5/6 or more stories, then this would only be of advantage to the blog and its readers. That's the way I see it. Don't wait. Write and post.

ken_b




msg:3386946
 2:31 pm on Jul 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

The articles are for SEO purposes

Then it may be even more important to add them one at a time on a daily basis. You want the bot to become addicted to reading the new content on your site on as frequent a basis as possible, so it visits your site on a daily basis.

I'd put a promotional blurb of and link to the article on the homepage, or at least a prominent link to the article, and have plenty of links on the article page to related product pages on your site.

TimmyMagic




msg:3387593
 9:04 am on Jul 6, 2007 (gmt 0)

I'd put a promotional blurb of and link to the article on the homepage, or at least a prominent link to the article, and have plenty of links on the article page to related product pages on your site.

I have been trying to put links into the articles to product pages, and sometimes there are obvious opportunities. However most of the time there is not a natural link to the product page.

For example, let's say I sell widgets - and lots of variations of them. The articles are usually about the general concept of widgets and not about specific widgets, such as green or blue widgets. If in the article I mention something about green widgets then I link naturally to the green widgets product page. However, because these are few and far between, should I link on the keyword widgets, and direct this link to the home page, where all the widgets are listed? Or is this bad form?

Are there any other things I could do? I was thinking perhaps of having something at the bottom of the article such as 'editors choice: We recommend.....' followed by a link to a widget page. Does anyone have tips on how to make this look natural? Or any other ideas?

Beagle




msg:3387990
 6:55 pm on Jul 6, 2007 (gmt 0)

Everything I'm going to say is coming from affiliate marketing experience rather than ecommerce, but there might be something useful --

One thing I would not do is link back to the home page from an article. The fact that a customer is reading one of your articles says they're probably looking for some guidance, which they won't get from being thrown back to the list of every available widget. Try to keep them moving forward rather than back.

There's nothing wrong with making a recommendation, but do all you can to fit it to the article rather than recommending the same widget on every page. For an article about "Caring for your New Widget" that mentions the fact that most widgets disintegrate if left out in the rain, you could link to the newly available waterproof widgets. An article about how to decide between buying a horizontally-oriented widget and a vertically-oriented widget could link to what you think are some of the best options for each. Etc. Etc. Etc. You could make it a challenge to take each article, think about its topic from the point of view of someone who might have picked that specific article to read (people who are widget experts are probably going to tend to read different articles than those who don't know a green widget from a blue one, for example), and think of what product(s) would be especially helpful for someone in their situation.

TimmyMagic




msg:3388145
 10:50 pm on Jul 6, 2007 (gmt 0)

Beagle,

I understand what you mean about not linking back to the home page.

However nearly all the articles are about the general subject of widgets, and to try and turn some of the articles into a natural link to a product page is almost impossible. There are times when it can be done, but on many of the articles there is no opportunity other than changing the subject of the article - or by making the change which would so obviously be just for linking to the product.

So, what I'd like to know is how it might still be possible to get a link to a product page for such articles. Maybe a tag line, saying "I hope you've found this article on widgets interesting. Please feel free to check out our latest blue widget". Or perhaps to have some kind of editorial link in the middle of the article, as this would probably be better for SEO.

I'm open to these ideas, but as I've said, some of the articles just cannot be made to naturally link to the product pages without a lot of rewording. Thanks for the tips though.

Beagle




msg:3388634
 12:01 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

IMHO, a tag line like the one you posted would be much better than linking back to the home page. It would be one thing if you had adsense or pop-up ads all over the place, but visitors certainly know they're on a commercial site that has the purpose of selling things, so I can't see that a polite plug for your products would be seen as anything but natural.

If you have any features available like product comparisons or "guide to buying widgets", etc., general pages could be a good place to remind people of those, too.

As I said earlier, my experience is from running content sites with affiliate marketing. Since my sites' main purpose is supposed to be providing information rather than selling anything, I have to integrate things a little more - but even on those sites I'll put affiliate links to products that are only generally related to what's on the page. On a site that's openly ecommerce, I'd think you'd have at least that much leeway before visitors would see it as too commercial.

ken_b




msg:3388637
 12:16 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

If I landed on any page on an ecom site that didn't have a link back to the home page I certainly wouldn't buy anything from the site.

TimmyMagic




msg:3388938
 5:49 pm on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

If I landed on any page on an ecom site that didn't have a link back to the home page I certainly wouldn't buy anything from the site.

There is a link back to the home page and all other major pages on every page on my site. No page is more than two clicks away from any other page on the entire site. So it's not a navigation issue.

What I was doing was adding a text link within the article on some major keywords back to the home page, where all the products are listed. Only one or two links per article, and not on all the articles. Some have natural links to the product, where the topic of the product is mentioned - even vaguely.

Now I realise that linking to the home page from within the article itself isn't such a good idea thanks to the contributers to this thread. I am going to start adding tag lines with links to the product pages - for those article which I cannot alter to incorporate a link within it.

Thanks for your replies.

ken_b




msg:3388942
 5:53 pm on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

>>link back;

Apparently I misunderstood, sorry.

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