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The Effective Affiliate Marketer Profile
What is the profile of an affiliate marketer? Why you?
Webwork




msg:3295428
 2:41 pm on Mar 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

I know there's no one size fits all when it comes to people and whatever. Still, there tends to be characteristics of people that lend to their success in different fields or endeavors.

How would you describe yourself?

What contributes to your effectiveness?

I'm fairly certain that character is not something that anyone will be able to copy so have at it.

A. What is it about you that you believe contributes to you ability to make a go in the affiliate world?

B. What is it that you believe makes others better able to make a go of it in the affiliate world?

I see people who are able to work on their own. People who may not work well with a boss. People who want to receive directly the fruits of their labor. People who are analytical.

Still, that's not all, so I ask: Why you?

To any affliate manager types: What do you see in people that makes them attractive affiliates?

 

Chuck Hamrick




msg:3295444
 3:05 pm on Mar 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

As an AM affiliate who are successful are from several different clans.

There are programmers who are good with datafeeds and able to design product based sites.

Reviews and content writeers.

Shopping, deal, couponers who have developed deep sites with all the specials and promos.

Search marketers who are experts at getting paid ads to convert.

Most are persistent and take their offline interests and talents online.

QualityNonsense




msg:3296349
 2:14 pm on Mar 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

Tenacity must be near the top of the list. You need to be happy to do a little hard graft to work out how to make a living as an affiliate. Not sure if the 1% inspiration / 99% perspiration split applies here, but the principle certainly applies.

ska_demon




msg:3296386
 2:44 pm on Mar 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

A. What is it about you that you believe contributes to your ability to make a go in the affiliate world?

I believe that feeling comfortable working in your underpants at 3am is a key part of an AMer's personality.

B. What is it that you believe makes others better able to make a go of it in the affiliate world?

Feeling comfortable working naked at 3pm.

Sorry ;oP

Ska

Jane_Doe




msg:3296532
 4:57 pm on Mar 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

I've had a lot of friends try it and never get very far. For many this was because they didn't want to invest any time in making sites without a guarantee of making any money. They were not risk takers. In the final anaylsis many took salaried or hourly wage jobs making much less than what I think they could have made in making web sites, especially when you add in their commute hours.

Others failed because they got bored. They really needed jobs where they worked with people more. And some just simply didn't have the technical aptitude needed to grasp everything you need to know like setting up a domain, finding a host, understanding the search algorithms, etc.

So I guess based in part on what I've learned doesn't work with my friends, I'd say to be successful you have to be willing to work hard with no absolute guarantee of getting paid, be able to work by yourself, and have a technical aptitude.

[edited by: Jane_Doe at 5:20 pm (utc) on Mar. 29, 2007]

thecleaner




msg:3296881
 11:17 pm on Mar 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

I read and tried everything I could get my hands on without making a dime for 5 years. That didnt bother me because I always saw it as a learning experience and Knew I would eventually get where I needed to be.

As someone once said "I have not failed. I Just have found 1001 ways that didnt work.

I contribute my success today to passion.

I finally got fed up with washing dishes and being treated like a looser a few years ago and moved in a tent behind walmart for 3 months, and worked 3 jobs so that I could quickly save up the money I needed for my online ventures.

I am what some ( at least my counselor) would call an "extremest" or "type A personality".

I love creating new business Ideas. I loved it before I even got paid for it. Its not as much as the money as it is the rush I get. Since I was 10 years old, I would lay in my bed late (sometimes until daylight) thinking of ways I could make money.

When you look at something as lucrative as online marketing its hard to see an end to the possibilities. You go to bed at night thinking of how much money you will have accumulated in interest 10 years from now.

You wake up with it on your mind again and you constantly get a flow of ideas.

Quite frankly I am obsessed with ideas that make money. I have two other established business bedsides this one, including real estate and car sales.

I absolutely love what I do and thats why I am good at it. I am so in tune with the box that I can easily think outside of it.

vik_c




msg:3297101
 6:57 am on Mar 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

The more money people get paid working for someone else, the harder it is for them to get into their own. The opportunity cost rises with every pay hike. When I've spoken to people who've spent years working for someone else they've usually said, 'I'm really keen to get into my own but only if I make atleast $X every month because that's what I'm making now'. Affiliate marketing is very uncertain and someone who gives up even a $3000 job to get into it may have to go a year or more without making anywhere close to that much. So yes, one needs to be a risk taker for sure.

skibum




msg:3297124
 7:35 am on Mar 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

I don't think you have to be a risk taker at all unless it is risking what would be your free time on venture after venture that may not work. You don't have to quit your job to do well & succeed to do well in aff. Though they can be very helpful, you really don't need any major tech skills either.

You have to be able to look at what most companies and agencies do and see the opportunities they they overlook. SEO, you mean tech, design, brand managers and financial people all have to come together, hahaha, no way that's gonna happen in many cases.

Your PPC agency has a fancy bid management system that will take care of your campaigns, they'll work with the engines to come up with keywords, set them all on broad match and the newest college grad at the agency or the engines will write some ads for your keywords because nobody else wants to do it. Everyone in that chain is getting paid by the hour or a percentage of spend, often incentivised for increasing the click costs and probably relies way to much on some automated system to adjust bids up & down when there are many aspects of bidding & PPC in general that only a human can fully exploit.

You have to be able to spot the weak spots in the way companies work and run online campaigns and the way they design sites. You have to be able to spot a website that will convert from a mile away. You have to know various keyword markets or be able to efficiently test them without losing more than about $500 or $1,000. You have to have the guts to bid agressively. Funny things can happen when you do.

You need to see possibilities everywhere, you need to be a guerilla, your brain always needs to be firing with fresh new ideas, you need to realize that many of the big sites out there just aren't that great and are are often there because they started early in the game, not because they offer any wonderful value proposition.

Maybe you used to think $50,000 or $100,000 was a great salary to aim for until you started to see your own efforts start to generate some recurring income, even a few grand a month. You saw the potential for freedom to try anything, have no boss, work with the savvy companies and simply not have to deal with the ones that you wouldn't want as clients. You want to be able to live like a C-level exec except for the work, politics & @$$ kissing part. You want some stability and to not have to worry about getting laid off.

Jane_Doe




msg:3297477
 3:38 pm on Mar 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

'I'm really keen to get into my own but only if I make atleast $X every month because that's what I'm making now'.

One of my friends wanted to try affiliate marketing. At the time he was between jobs. He said he had one day a week he could work at it for a few months then if he wasn't making his old full time salary he'd have to look for a regular job. So to work for himself he was only willing to invest about two weeks of full time work total and then if he wasn't making a tidy 5 figure salary he was going to have to look for something salaried.

In other areas I think this person is extremely sharp, so it was weird how unrealistic he was at how much effort it would take to build up his own business and how little effort he was willing to put in before giving up, even though he talked a lot about how great it would be to work from home and he certainly had the brains to be able to do it if he had really applied himself.

I don't think you have to be a risk taker at all unless it is risking what would be your free time on venture after venture that may not work

Willing to risk your free time is exactly what I was talking about.

[edited by: Jane_Doe at 3:41 pm (utc) on Mar. 30, 2007]

Beagle




msg:3297924
 10:28 pm on Mar 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

thecleaner - This "someone" shows you to be in pretty good company:
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.
-- Thomas A. Edison

ETA: I'm not profiling myself because I'm not particularly effective as an affiliate marketer. I love my day job, and am gradually building up both affiliate and ecommerce sites during all my "free time" because I want to try out my ideas and have something actually working before I retire. My main risk is being evicted because I don't take time to clean my apartment...

[edited by: Beagle at 10:40 pm (utc) on Mar. 30, 2007]

gopi




msg:3311765
 5:39 pm on Apr 15, 2007 (gmt 0)

>> I am so in tune with the box that I can easily think outside of it.

I believe this describes me too!. I am a average skilled SEO and a average skilled PPC'er... But my real skill is i think so differently than others i can easily identify an oppurtunity. This skill served me soo good that i dont have to worry about money for the rest of my life and i am just a 30 yr old!

Greenboy




msg:3312077
 3:32 am on Apr 16, 2007 (gmt 0)

Hi all, I'm brand new here. Don't know what took me so long - I've been active in AM for about 6 months and I've heard tons about WW and even heard Brett on Webmaster Radio. Anyway, I'm beginning to have some success with AM and am on my way to 6 figures + in 2007.

I think a major part of what contributes to effectiveness in AM is an ability to create positive relationships with affiliate managers. This has opened a lot of doors for me and allowed me access to tools and information that may not be readily available to other affiliates. I now feel that these relationships are essential to success in AM. At least, my success. If you can prove to your affiliate managers that 1) you can perform, and 2) you can be trusted, things get a lot easier.

Additionally, I think a strong will to reinvest all profits back into growing your business is invaluable, especially for those heavily invested in PPC (100% for me right now). The temptation is there for me to pull some of of the profits out of the business to get a desperately needed new(er) car. I'm not in this for a few dollars or a newer car though - I'm quite confident that I'll be one of the millionaires that affiliate marketing has made.

Finally, I really think that little can be accomplished without some investment in yourself. Exercise, eat right, be spiritual, practice kindness, continue learning. Treat these things as equally important to landing page testing and keyword research, and I think you can make a better go at it :)

eljefe3




msg:3312080
 3:41 am on Apr 16, 2007 (gmt 0)

Welcome to WebmasterWorld Greenboy :)

mfishy




msg:3312844
 8:14 pm on Apr 16, 2007 (gmt 0)

The exact same attributes that make for a successful entrepreneur.

aeiouy




msg:3313156
 3:47 am on Apr 17, 2007 (gmt 0)

I think you really need to not only be willing to accept failure but thrive on it.

For me most of the time things I try out don't work. If I could tell you all the sure-as-shooting-cant-miss plans I had where I was sure a particular campaign was going to be golden and didn't work out... Yet on the other hand there is stuff you were never sure about that just takes off.

If you are easily discouraged you will not likely last long, unless you get extremely lucky out of the box, which rarely happens.

One thing I have found about myself since I have moved to affiliate marketing, is failure, crisis and disappointment are the things that spur me on to greater heights. It is much more difficult for me to grow and expand when I am sitting fat and happy. When something goes wrong, though, that is not only when I address the problem, I fly right past it on to better things.

That is me personally though.. But definitely, like I said, being willing to accept failure.

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